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ELECTION UPDATES: Biden is 46th president after Pennsylvania win

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UPDATE 9:26 a.m.: Democrat Joe Biden has won Pennsylvania, surpassing the 270 electoral vote threshold to take the White House and become the 46th president of the United States.

Biden also carried Arizona, Wisconsin and Michigan on his path to the presidency, flipping states that President Donald Trump won in 2016.

Pennsylvania was a must-win state for Trump.

The 77-year-old Biden was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and sought to contrast his working-class roots with the affluent Trump’s by casting the race as “Scranton versus Park Avenue.”

Biden’s victory came after more than three days of uncertainty as election officials sorted through a surge of mail-in votes that delayed the processing of some ballots.

Trump is the first incumbent president to lose reelection since Republican George H.W. Bush in 1992.

EXPLAINER: Why AP called Pennsylvania for Biden


11:40 a.m.: Sen. Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential nominee, is congratulating President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris.

The Utah Republican tweeted Saturday that he and his wife know Biden and Harris “as people of good will and admirable character.” He says, “We pray that God may bless them in the days and years ahead.”

Romney, President Donald Trump's most vocal critic within the Republican Party, said Friday that Trump was “damaging the cause of freedom” and inflaming “destructive and dangerous passions” by claiming, without foundation, that the election was rigged and stolen from him.

Trump has so far refused to concede and is promising unspecified legal challenges.

Romney had said earlier in the year that he wasn't voting for Trump. He didn't say for whom he did vote, however.


11 a.m.: Two former Democratic presidents are offering their congratulations to President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris.
 
Bill Clinton tweeted that “America has spoken and democracy has won.” The 42nd president also predicted Biden and Harris would “serve all of us and bring us all together.”
 
Jimmy Carter, the 39th president, said in a statement Saturday that he and his wife, Rosalynn, are “proud” of the Democrats’ “well-run campaign and seeing the positive change they bring to our nation.”
 
Neither Clinton nor Carter mentioned President Donald Trump in their congratulatory remarks.
 
Biden was a young Delaware senator when Carter served as president from 1977 to 1981. Biden had risen in the ranks to Senate Judiciary Committee chairman by Clinton’s presidency in the 1990s and led confirmation hearings for Clinton’s two Supreme Court nominees: Justice Stephen Breyer and the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.


UPDATE 4:05 p.m.: Democrat Joe Biden is adding to his lead over President Donald Trump in Georgia.

As of early Friday evening, Biden had overtaken Trump by 4,235 votes in the battleground state, which Trump must win to have a shot at reelection.

The Democrat first surpassed Trump in the state vote count on Friday morning as votes continue to be counted.

The contest is still too early for The Associated Press to call.

Trump’s lead dwindled after Election Day when state officials began processing mail-in ballots, a form of voting that has skewed heavily in Biden’s favor after Trump spent months claiming — without proof — that voting by mail would lead to widespread voter fraud.

If there is less than a 0.5 percentage point difference between Biden’s and Trump’s vote totals, state law dictates that a recount must be held. Biden currently holds a lead of about 0.08 percentage points.

A Democratic presidential candidate hasn't won Georgia since Bill Clinton in 1992.


UPDATE 7:50 a.m.: Democrat Joe Biden has overtaken President Donald Trump in Pennsylvania and Georgia.

The election hinges on the outcome of tight contests in those key battleground states.

The new results Friday come as Trump is trying to undermine confidence in this week’s election.

With his pathway to reelection appearing to shrink, Trump advanced unsupported accusations of voter fraud Thursday to falsely argue Biden was trying to seize power.

It amounted to an extraordinary effort by a sitting American president to sow doubt about the democratic process.

Trump's remarks also prompted a rebuke from some fellow Republicans, particularly those looking to steer the party in a different direction in a post-Trump era. 


UPDATE 6:00 p.m.: Election Election officials in several states say they are worried about the safety of their staffs amid a cascade of threats and protesters responding to President Donald Trump’s baseless insistence of widespread voter fraud in the race for the White House.  

Groups of Trump supporters have gathered at vote tabulation sites in Phoenix, Detroit and Philadelphia, decrying counts that showed Democrat Joe Biden leading or gaining ground.

While the protests have not been violent or very large, local officials were exasperated and concerned by the relentless accusations.  


UPDATE 5:05 p.m.: The Associated Press has not declared a winner in the presidential race, with a number of battleground states still too early to call.

But President Donald Trump is renewing his unfounded claims that Democrats are trying to “steal” the election from him. He did not back up his claim with any details or evidence. State and federal officials have not reported any instances of widespread voter fraud.

Trump spoke from the White House briefing room on Thursday, unleashing harsh criticism of pre-election polling that showed him trailing Democrat Joe Biden and claiming without evidence that the ballot-counting process is unfair and corrupt. He also renewed his criticism of widespread use of mail-in balloting in the pandemic.

The ballot-counting process across the country has been running smoothly, and the count is ongoing in several battleground states.


UPDATE 4:04 p.m.: Election Election officials in several states say they are worried about the safety of their staffs amid a cascade of threats and protesters responding to President Donald Trump’s baseless insistence of widespread voter fraud in the race for the White House.

Groups of Trump supporters have gathered at vote tabulation sites in Phoenix, Detroit and Philadelphia, decrying counts that showed Democrat Joe Biden leading or gaining ground.

While the protests have not been violent or very large, local officials were exasperated and concerned by the relentless accusations. 


UPDATE 4 p.m.: President Donald Trump is set to make his first public appearance since the early morning hours after Election Day.

You can view it below.

WATCH NOW: EVENT LIVESTREAM

The White House says Trump will deliver remarks at 6:30 p.m. Thursday from the press briefing room. It was unclear if he would take questions

Trump last appeared in public early Wednesday, when he falsely declared victory over Democrat Joe Biden in the presidential race. Trump has also publicly called for vote counting to stop by citing baseless allegations of fraud and misconduct.

The presidential race has not yet been called because neither Trump nor Biden has yet collected the requisite 270 Electoral College votes.

Biden's victories in Michigan and Wisconsin have put him in a commanding position to win the presidency, but Trump has showed no sign of giving up.


UPDATE 11:30 a.m.: A Michigan judge has dismissed a lawsuit by President Donald Trump's campaign in a dispute over whether Republican challengers had access to the handling of absentee ballots.

Judge Cynthia Stephens noted that the lawsuit was filed late Wednesday afternoon, just hours before the last ballots were counted. She also said the defendant, Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, was the wrong person to sue because she doesn’t control the logistics of local ballot counting, even if she is the state’s chief election officer.

The Associated Press called the Michigan presidential election for Democrat Joe Biden on Wednesday evening. Trump won the state in 2016.

The lawsuit claimed Benson, a Democrat, was allowing absentee ballots to be counted without teams of bipartisan observers as well as challengers. She was accused of undermining the “constitutional right of all Michigan voters ... to participate in fair and lawful elections.”

Benson, through state attorneys, denied the allegations. Much of the dispute centered on the TCF Center in Detroit where pro-Trump protesters gathered while absentee ballots were being counted.


UPDATE 9:45 a.m.: A judge in Georgia has dismissed a lawsuit by the state Republican Party and President Donald Trump's campaign that asked him to ensure a coastal county was following state laws on processing absentee ballots.

Chatham County Superior Court Judge James Bass did not provide an explanation for his decision Thursday at the close of a roughly one-hour hearing. The county includes the heavily Democratic city of Savannah.

The suit had raised concerns about 53 absentee ballots that poll observers said were not part of an original batch of ballots. County elections officials testified that all 53 ballots had been received on time.


UPDATE 5:10 p.m.: President Donald Trump's campaign and the Georgia Republican Party have filed a lawsuit against the Chatham County Board of Elections asking a judge to order the county to secure and account for ballots received after 7 p.m. on Election Day.

State party chair David Shafer said in a statement Wednesday night that they planned to sue in a dozen counties.

The lawsuit alleges that a Republican observer watched a poll worker take unprocessed absentee ballots from a back room and mix them into processed absentee ballots waiting to be tabulated.

In Georgia, ballots must be received by 7 p.m. on Election Day in order to count. Chatham County contains Savannah and leans Democratic.

A woman who answered the phone at the Chatham County Board of Elections offices declined to comment.

Georgia is among a handful of states that The Associated Press has not called. In the race to the 270 electoral votes needed to win the presidency, Democrat Joe Biden currently has 264 while Trump has 214.


UPDATE 4:15 p.m.: Joe Biden has won Michigan and Wisconsin, pushing him closer to 270 Electoral College votes and narrowing President Donald Trump’s path to reelection.

Only a handful of battleground states remain uncalled including Georgia, North Carolina and Pennsylvania.

Both Michigan and Wisconsin represent parts of the “blue wall” that slipped away from Democrats four years ago, paving the way to Trump’s election.

Biden’s campaign had been hoping to win back at least some of them.


UPDATE 2:45 p.m.: Joe Biden has won Wisconsin, reclaiming a key part of the “blue wall” that slipped away from Democrats four years ago and narrowing President Donald Trump’s pathway to reelection. But neither candidate has cleared the 270 Electoral College votes needed to win the White House, and the margins are tight in several fiercely contested states,. Those include the Great Lakes battlegrounds of Michigan and Pennsylvania. But Biden’s victory in Wisconsin, one of the most fiercely contested states, looms as an important step to the White House.


UPDATE 4:20 p.m.: Joe Biden says he’s not ready to declare victory as vote counting continues in the presidential election, but he says, “When the count is finished, we believe we will be the winners.”

The Associated Press hasn't called the presidential race. Biden currently has 248 electoral votes, while President Donald Trump has 214. It takes 270 to win the presidency.

Biden addressed reporters Wednesday afternoon from Wilmington, Delaware, alongside his running mate, California Sen. Kamala Harris.

Biden says, “Every vote must be counted.” He added, “We the people will not be silenced.”

Biden also tried to sound like a president-elect, promising to reach out to political opponents and insisting that the presidency “itself is not a partisan institution.”

Biden did not take questions. President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign has filed lawsuits in Pennsylvania and Michigan as ballots continue to be counted in both states.


UPDATE 12:16 p.m.: Joe Biden has defeated President Donald Trump in battleground Wisconsin, securing the state’s 10 electoral votes and reclaiming a key part of the blue wall that slipped away from Democrats four years ago.

The Associated Press called Wisconsin for Biden after election officials in the state said all outstanding ballots had been counted, save for a few hundred in one township and an expected small number of provisional ballots.

Trump’s campaign has requested a recount. Statewide recounts in Wisconsin have historically changed the vote tally by only a few hundred votes; Biden leads by .624 percentage points out of nearly 3.3 million ballots counted.

The victory for Biden bumps him up to 248 electoral votes, while Trump has 214. It takes 270 to win the presidency.

In 2016, Trump won Wisconsin by fewer than 23,000 votes, a breakthrough that along with wins in Michigan and Pennsylvania helped hand him his first term in the White House. Democrats were determined to reclaim Wisconsin, a state that before Trump hadn’t gone for a Republican since Ronald Reagan in 1984.


UPDATE 12:02 p.m.: President Donald Trump’s campaign says it has filed a lawsuit trying to halt the vote count in battleground Michigan.

The latest counts gives Trump’s Democratic challenger Joe Biden a small lead, but the race is still too early to call.

Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien says in a statement Wednesday that the campaign “has not been provided with meaningful access to numerous counting locations to observe the opening of ballots and the counting process, as guaranteed by Michigan law.”

He says a suit was filed Wednesday in the Michigan Court of Claims “to halt counting until meaningful access has been granted.”

Michigan is a critical battleground state that helped deliver Trump the presidency four years ago, along with Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. Neither Wisconsin or Pennsylvania has been called yet.


UPDATE 11:30 a.m.: Joe Biden will address the election results Wednesday, even as it remains too early for The Associated Press to call the presidential race.

You can watch it below.

 
The Democratic presidential candidate will issue a televised address in Wilmington, Delaware. He’s been watching the returns come in with family from his home there.
 
Biden’s campaign manager expressed confidence in an eventual win for Democrats during a call with reporters earlier Wednesday, pointing to their projections of the outcome in Nevada, Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania.
 
But the AP is not calling the presidential race yet because neither candidate has secured the 270 Electoral College votes needed for victory. The AP called Arizona for Biden, but several key states remain too early to call: Pennsylvania, Georgia, Michigan, Wisconsin, North Carolina and Nevada.
 
As it stands, Biden has 238 electoral votes, while Trump has 214.


UPDATE 11:24 a.m.: President Donald Trump has won one of Maine’s four electoral votes, just as he did in 2016.
 
Trump carried the state’s 2nd Congressional District, the more rural and conservative of Maine’s congressional districts.
 
While Democrat Joe Biden easily carried the state itself, Maine is one of only two states that divides its electoral votes.
 
Biden won the 1st Congressional District and the statewide tally, good for three electoral votes. Trump’s victory in the 2nd Congressional District means he wins one electoral vote.
 
Maine split its electoral votes four years ago, awarding three to Democrat Hillary Clinton and one to Trump.
 
2016 marked the first time in state history that Maine divided its electoral votes.
 
In the race to the 270 electoral votes needed to win, Biden has 238 while Trump has 214.


UPDATE 10:45 a.m.: President Donald Trump’s campaign manager Bill Stepien says the president plans to “immediately” request a recount in the battleground state of Wisconsin, where the race remains close.

In Wisconsin, if a race is within 1 percentage point, the trailing candidate can force a recount.

Stepien says in a statement Wednesday: “The President is well within the threshold to request a recount and we will immediately do so.”

The fate of the United States presidency is hanging in the balance, with Trump and his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, battling for three familiar battleground states - Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania - that could prove crucial in determining who wins the White House.

In the race to the 270 electoral votes needed to win, Biden has 238 while Trump has 213.


UPDATE 10:10 a.m.: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is discounting President Donald Trump’s early claim that he'd already won the election, saying it’s going to take a while for states to conduct their vote counts.
 
The Kentucky Republican and Trump ally said Wednesday that “claiming you’ve won the election is different from finishing the counting.”
 
McConnell also says he is untroubled by Trump’s vows to contest the vote count in key states, telling reporters in Louisville that “you should not be shocked that both sides are going to have lawyers there.”
 
He added that “the courts will decide disputes. That’s the way we do it in this country.”
 
Early Wednesday, Trump said, “We will win this, and as far as I’m concerned we already have won it.”
 
But the outcome is still unclear in key states Trump would need if he is to win against Democrat Joe Biden.


UPDATE 9:55 a.m.: The fate of the U.S. presidency is still hanging in the balance. On the day after Election Day, President Donald Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden are battling over three familiar battleground states - Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania - that could prove crucial in determining who wins the White House.

It is unclear when or how quickly a winner can be determined.

The latest vote counts in Michigan and Wisconsin have given Biden a small lead in those states, but it is still too early to call the races. And a recount seems likely in Wisconsin.

Voting was generally calm in the conclusion of an epic campaign amid the surging coronavirus pandemic and foundational questions of economic fairness and racial justice.


UPDATE 7:15 a.m.: Three members of Idaho’s U.S. congressional delegation kept their seats and voters permanently set the number of Idaho's legislative districts at 35.

Idaho Republican Sen. Jim Risch has been reelected to Congress, defeating Democratic challenger Paulette Jordan.

U.S. Rep. Russ Fulcher, a Republican, has retained his seat for a second term, defeating Democratic challenger Rudy Soto.

And U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson also won, gaining a 12th term representing Idaho residents in the eastern-most half of the state.

Simpson defeated Democrat Aaron Swisher for the second time on Tuesday.


UPDATE 2:00 a.m.: Democrat Joe Biden's campaign says it will fight any efforts by President Donald Trump's campaign to go to the U.S. Supreme Court to prevent ballots from being tabulated.

In a statement sent before 4 a.m. Wednesday, Biden campaign manager Jen O'Malley Dillon called Trump's statement that he will “be going to the U.S. Supreme Court” and that he wants “all voting to stop” “outrageous, unprecedented and incorrect.”

O'Malley Dillon says the Biden campaign has “legal teams standing by ready to deploy to resist that effort.” And she says, “They will prevail.”

The Associated Press has not declared a winner in the presidential race. There are still hundreds of thousands of votes left to be counted, and the outcome hinges on a handful of uncalled battleground states.


UPDATE 1:59 a.m.: President Donald Trump carried Florida, the nation’s most prized battleground state, and then he and Democrat Joe Biden focused early Wednesday on three Northern industrial states in the race for the White House. Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania could prove crucial in determining who wins the election. However, the somewhat-normal back-and-forth jockeying for the states was overshadowed by Trump’s extraordinary early-morning declaration from the White House -he called for many outstanding ballots not to be counted. Voting was generally calm in the conclusion of an epic campaign that will shape America’s response to the surging pandemic and foundational questions of economic fairness and racial justice.


UPDATE 1:06 a.m.: Democrat Joe Biden has won at least three of Maine’s four electoral votes in his bid to unseat President Donald Trump.

Biden won the statewide tally and the 1st Congressional District, good for three electoral votes. Trump, meanwhile, hoped to claim one electoral vote in a win in the 2nd Congressional District. The 2nd Congressional District hasn't yet been called.

Maine split its electoral votes four years ago, awarding three to Democrat Hillary Clinton and one to Trump, who won the more rural and conservative of Maine’s congressional districts.

It marked the first time in state history that Maine divided its electoral votes.

Maine is one of only two states that divides its electoral votes. The other is Nebraska.

In the race to the 270 electoral votes needed to win, Biden has 238 while Trump has 213.


UPDATE 1:05 a.m.: Incumbent Jeff Hough won the Bannock Commissioner 2 race with 22,825 votes and 59%. Lisa Alexander received 15,661 votes and 41%.


UPDATE 1:04 a.m.: Incumbent Ernie Moser won the Bannock Commissioner 1 race with 17,005 votes making 45%. Lorin Nielsen received 13,328 votes making 35%, and Robert Ballard received 7,453 votes making 20%.


UPDATE 1:03 a.m.: Clint Lemieux won the Teton ID Sheriff race with 3,223 votes making 51%. Jeremiah Jones received 3,057 votes with 49%.


UPDATE 1:02 a.m.: Tony Manu won the race for Bannock Sheriff with 27,552 votes and 73%. Nate Stewart received 10,186 votes and 27%.


UPDATE 1:01 a.m.: Dustin Manwaring beat incumbent Chris Abernathy for the Idaho Representative 29A seat. Manwaring won 10,181 votes making 54%, and Abernathy won 8,753 votes making 46%.


UPDATE 1:00 a.m.: Incumbent Justin Oleson won 80% and 1,794 votes for Custer Prosecuting Attorney. Jason Mackrill received 455 votes making 20%.


UPDATE 12:59 a.m.: Hootie Langseth won the Butte Commissioner 2 race with 1,041 votes and 76%. Bill Moncur received 322 votes and 24%.


UPDATE 12:52 a.m.: Democrat Joe Biden has won Arizona and its 11 electoral votes, flipping a critical battleground state that Donald Trump won four years ago and that could help determine which candidate wins the presidency.

The victory by Biden was a huge blow to Trump’s chances for reelection. Arizona has backed a Democratic presidential candidate only once in the last 72 years.

Biden’s campaign had focused on Arizona as part of its expanded battleground map through the Sun Belt, citing demographic changes, new residents and realignment away from Republicans among key suburban voters.

Arizona is among the more than half a dozen states that will help determine which candidate gets the 270 electoral votes to capture the White House.

Biden’s massive advantage in campaign cash allowed him to put Trump on defense across the country and work to build an unstoppable lead in the Electoral College.


UPDATE 12:40 a.m.: President Donald Trump is vowing to ask the Supreme Court to weigh in on the inconclusive election. The Associated Press has not declared a winner in the presidential race.

Trump appeared before supporters at the White House early Wednesday morning and cried foul over the election results, calling the process “a major fraud on our nation.” But there’s no evidence of foul play in the cliffhanger.

The night ended with hundreds of thousands of votes still to be counted, and the outcome still unclear in key states he needs if he is to win against Democrat Joe Biden.

Nevertheless, he has cast the night as a disenfranchisement of his voters. He said: “We will win this and as far as I’m concerned we already have won it.”

Trump says: “We’ll be going to the U.S. Supreme Court - we want all voting to stop.” In fact, there is no more voting - just counting.


UPDATE 12:21 a.m.: Incumbent Chad Christensen won 71% and 10,204 votes in the Idaho Representative 32B race. Bill Leake received 4,112 votes and 29%.


UPDATE 12:12 a.m.: Bingham Sheriff Craig Rowland won 85% of the vote with 16,113 votes against Vaughn LeFevre who received 2,741 votes and 15%.


UPDATE 12:01 a.m.: Incumbent Julianne Young beat Travis Oler for the Idaho Representative 31B seat. Young received 12,390 votes making 64%, and Oler received 7,040 votes making 36%.


UPDATE 11:50 p.m.: Incumbent Randy Armstrong won the Idaho Representative 28A race against Mike Saville.


UPDATE 11:27 p.m.: President Donald Trump has won four of Nebraska's five electoral votes, while Democrat Joe Biden has won one electoral vote from the state.

The 1st Congressional District was called for Trump early Wednesday. He also won the 3rd Congressional District earlier, as well as the statewide vote. Trump gets one electoral vote for each congressional district, plus two electoral votes for winning the statewide vote.

Biden's win in the 2nd Congressional District, which includes Omaha, is a flip from 2016, when Trump narrowly won it against Democrat Hillary Clinton.

While Trump easily carried the state itself, Nebraska is one of only two states that divides its electoral votes.

In 2016, Trump won all five of Nebraska’s electoral votes.


UPDATE 11:22 p.m.: Democrat Joe Biden has won Nebraska’s 2nd Congressional District, which includes Omaha. That flips a district that Donald Trump won in 2016.

Nebraska, one of two states that divides its electoral votes, has five total electoral votes up for grabs. On Tuesday, Trump won the statewide vote, which is good for two electoral votes. He also won the 3rd Congressional District, which nets him a third vote.

Biden earns one electoral vote for winning Nebraska's 2nd Congressional District. Nebraska's 1st Congressional District hasn't yet been called.

In 2016, Trump narrowly won Nebraska’s 2nd Congressional District over Democrat Hillary Clinton.


UPDATE 11:06 p.m.: Republican U.S. Rep. Russ Fulcher retained his seat in Congress.

Fulcher will serve a second term representing the 1st Congressional District in western Idaho after defeating Democrat Rudy Soto.

Republicans have long dominated red-state Idaho, where Mike Simpson and Fulcher turned aside their challengers.

Fulcher and Simpson have both voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act.


UPDATE 11:04 p.m. Joshua Campbell will continue being Power Sheriff. Campbell won with 2,129 votes making up 70%. Max Sprague received 927 votes which is 30%.


UPDATE 11:03 p.m.: Hootie Langseth won the Butte Commissioner 2 race with 1,041 votes making up 76%. Bill Moncur received 322 votes which is 24%.


UPDATE 10:59 p.m.: Democrat Joe Biden has won at least one of Maine's four electoral votes in his bid to unseat President Donald Trump.

Biden won Maine's 1st Congressional District, good for one electoral vote. The statewide vote, which is worth two electoral votes, and the 2nd Congressional District, which is worth one electoral vote, still have not been called.

Maine split its electoral votes four years ago, awarding three to Democrat Hillary Clinton and one to Trump, who won the more rural and conservative of Maine’s congressional districts.

It marked the first time in state history that Maine divided its electoral votes.

Maine is one of only two states that divides its electoral votes. The other is Nebraska.


UPDATE 10:43 p.m.: Republican U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson on Tuesday retained his seat in Congress.

Simpson will serve a 12th term representing the 2nd Congressional District in eastern Idaho after defeating Democrat Aaron Swisher on Tuesday.

Republicans have long dominated red-state Idaho, and Simpson turned aside his Democratic challenger.

He also easily defeated challengers in the Republican primary in May.


UPDATE 10:35 p.m. President Donald Trump has won Florida and its 29 electoral votes, the biggest prize among the perennial battlegrounds and a state crucial to his reelection hopes.

A victory in Florida means reelection is within Trump’s grasp. A loss in the state would have made it nearly impossible for Trump to reach the 270 electoral votes needed to retain the White House.

Democrat Joe Biden’s campaign had hoped the devastating toll of the coronavirus pandemic, particularly among older adults, would put him in a strong position in a state popular with retirees.

Trump moved his official residence to his Palm Beach estate Mar-a-Lago from New York last year.

Trump narrowly beat Democrat Hillary Clinton in the state in 2016.


UPDATE 10:23 p.m.: Both Natalia Macker and Gregory Epstein will continue to be Teton WY Commissioners. Macker received 6,647 votes making 27%. Epstein received 5,149 votes making 21%.


UPDATE 10:22 p.m.: Hailey Morton Levinson is Jackson's new Mayor. Levinson won with 61% and 3,405 votes to Micahel Kudar's 39% and 2,140 votes.


UPDATE 10:21 p.m.: Incumbent Jim Guthrie has beat Dan Karlan for Idaho Senator 28.


UPDATE 10:20 p.m.: President Donald Trump has won Iowa and Montana.
 
The Republican nominee on Wednesday was awarded six electoral votes from Iowa and three electoral votes from Montana.
 
Trump won Iowa by more than 9 percentage points four years ago against Democrat Hillary Clinton, but his support eroded significantly over his handling of the coronavirus pandemic and the overall direction of the country.
 
Trump rallied in Iowa in the final stretch of the campaign, going so far as to announce he would be awarding the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Iowa wrestling legend Dan Gable. In an appeal to the state’s farmers, he told them he was responsible for $28 billion in aid designed to help offset damage stemming from his trade war with China.


UPDATE 10:19 p.m.: President Donald Trump has won Ohio and its 18 electoral votes, holding on to a battleground state where the race against Democrat Joe Biden had tightened in recent months.
 
The Republican nominee comfortably carried the Midwestern state four years ago, but polls heading into the final weeks showed Biden well within range, forcing the president to spend more time in the state than anyone expected.
 
In 2016, Trump saw notable support from blue-collar manufacturing and mining communities disenchanted with his opponent, Democrat Hillary Clinton, and buoyed by the Republican’s promise to bring back jobs to their hard-hit communities.
 
Biden saw the gap as overly daunting early on but seized an opening in the closing months amid Trump’s softening support among college-educated suburban women. The campaign responded with a summer ad blitz and string of in-person campaign appearances.


UPDATE 10:13 p.m. - Joe Biden wins Minnesota.


UPDATE 10:06 p.m.: Democrat Joe Biden has won the state of Hawaii.

He was awarded its four electoral votes on Tuesday.

Hawaii is a reliably Democratic state and last went for a Republican presidential candidate in 1984, when it was won by Ronald Reagan.


UPDATE 9:08 p.m.: President Donald Trump has won the state of Utah.

The Republican nominee on Tuesday was awarded its six electoral votes.

Utah hasn’t supported a Democratic presidential candidate since Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964.

Trump won Utah in 2016, but independent candidate Evan McMullin had a strong showing in the state owing to widespread distaste of both Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton. McMullin captured more than 20% of the vote.


UPDATE 9:02 p.m. - Donald Trump wins Idaho.


UPDATE 9:01 p.m. Republican Jim Risch wins reelection to U.S. Senate from Idaho.


UPDATE 9:00 p.m. Joe Biden wins Washington.


UPDATE 8:57 p.m. Democrat Joe Biden has won New Hampshire and its four electoral votes, holding on to a state that President Donald Trump only narrowly lost in 2016.
 
The state was considered a 2020 battleground despite not going for a Republican presidential candidate since George W. Bush in 2000.
 
Four years ago, Democrat Hillary Clinton won the small state over Trump by roughly 2,700 votes. That’s less than 1% of the 732,000 ballots cast, and it was the second-closest margin of victory in the country.
 
Biden didn’t fare as well in New Hampshire’s first-in-the-nation Democratic primary in February. He finished a dismal fifth, behind Bernie Sanders, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar and Elizabeth Warren. But his candidacy took off after a commanding win later that month in the South Carolina primary, leading to the exits of several of his competitors.


UPDATE 8:31 p.m.: President Donald Trump has won the state of Missouri.

The Republican nominee on Tuesday was awarded its 10 electoral votes.

In 2016, Trump beat Democrat Hillary Clinton in the state by 18 percentage points.


UPDATE 8:30 p.m. President Donald Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden are locked in tight races in battleground states across the country, the Associated Press reported. It's the conclusion of an epic campaign that will shape America’s response to the surging pandemic and foundational questions of economic fairness and racial justice. From coast to coast, races were too early call Tuesday night in the most fiercely contested states on the map, including Florida, North Carolina, Georgia and Pennsylvania. Both candidate each picked up some predictable victories, with Trump taking states including Kansas and North Dakota and Biden’s haul including Colorado and Virginia, two former battlegrounds that have become a Democratic strongholds.


UPDATE: 8:37 p.m.: Democrat Joe Biden has won the state of Colorado.
 
He was awarded its nine electoral votes on Tuesday.
 
The state, which went for Democrat Hillary Clinton four years ago, has trended sharply to the left since President Donald Trump’s 2016 election.
 
The state also has a competitive Senate race between Republican incumbent Cory Gardner and the state’s former governor John Hickenlooper. Gardner is considered one of the nation’s most vulnerable senators.


UPDATE 8:27 p.m.: Democrat Joe Biden has won the District of Columbia.


UPDATE 8:04 p.m.: Republican Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox has won the race for Utah governor. He replaces the leader who endorsed him in a race that played out during the coronavirus pandemic. Cox defeated Democrat Chris Peterson, a law professor who continued to advocate for a mask mandate as cases spiked this fall. Cox supported Republican Gov. Gary Herbert’s decision to encourage them but not require their use. The general election came after a hard-fought GOP primary where Cox beat out three other competitors for the nomination that’s often decisive in conservative Utah. He will succeed Herbert, who first took office in 2009 and decided not to run again this year.


UPDATE 7:10 p.m.: President Donald Trump beat former Vice President Joe Biden to claim Wyoming's three electoral votes. Wyoming hasn't chosen a Democrat for president since Lyndon Johnson in 1964.


UPDATE 7:05 p.m.: Republican former U.S. Rep. Cynthia Lummis has won an open U.S. Senate seat in Wyoming.

Lummis beat University of Wyoming ecology professor and climate activist Merav Ben-David to claim the seat held by Republican Sen. Mike Enzi, who is retiring after four terms.

Lummis was heavily favored to win in GOP-dominated Wyoming after raising and spending far more money than her Democratic opponent.

Lummis comes from a prominent Cheyenne ranching family and has been well-known in Wyoming politics for over 30 years.

Lummis was Wyoming's lone congresswoman from 2009-2017, when she stepped down to attend to family business matters following her husband's death.

She served as state treasurer from 1999-2007 and served for 14 years in the Wyoming House and Senate in the 1980s and 1990s.


UPDATE 7:00 p.m.: Republican Rep. Liz Cheney has won a third term as Wyoming's lone representative in the U.S. House.

Cheney beat Democrat Lynnette Grey Bull, a Northern Arapaho tribal member and Global Indigenous Council vice president.

Cheney vastly out-raised and outspent Grey Bull, who was little known before the campaign.

Cheney has risen quickly in the House GOP leadership since her election to Congress in 2016. She has served since 2019 as Republican conference chair, the party's third-highest leadership position in the chamber.

Cheney is the elder daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney. Liz Cheney worked in the State Department and was a Fox News commentator before entering politics.

It was the first time two women were the main competitors for U.S. House in Wyoming.


UPDATE 5:18 p.m.: President Donald Trump will win Indiana, CNN projects, taking the first state of the night as polls are beginning to close in some states, including key battlegrounds, in a momentous election unfolding amid multiple crises including the worst pandemic in 100 years. You can view more HERE.


UPDATE: 12 p.m.: Three members of Idaho’s U.S. congressional delegation are trying to keep their seats and voters will decide whether to change what the state Constitution says about legislative districts in Tuesday's election. Also, Democrat and former state lawmaker Paulette Jordan is challenging longtime Idaho politician U.S. Sen. Jim Risch, a Republican, for his seat.


UPDATE 10 a.m.: Democrat Paulette Jordan is no stranger to long shots, occasionally touting her trips to the shooting range during her campaign to unseat U.S. Sen. Jim Risch. Still, Jordan’s race against Risch is likely her longest shot yet in the ultra-red state of Idaho. The 77-year-old incumbent has a long political history in Idaho, serving as a state lawmaker, lieutenant governor and governor before he was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2008. Jordan, also a former state lawmaker as well as a Coeur d’Alene Tribal Council member, has avid supporters gained in her unsuccessful 2018 gubernatorial run against then-Lt. Gov. Brad Little. 


UPDATE 9:24 a.m.: Republican U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson has swept aside challenges from within his own party and Democratic contenders to retain his seat in Congress representing Idaho's 2nd Congressional District for more than two decades. The 70-year-old Simpson appears poised to do so again on Tuesday in the red state. He’s up against Democrat Aaron Swisher, an economist and former Micron Technology, Inc. employee who says his primary goal is to create a better deal for working-class Americans. U.S. Rep. Russ Fulcher is seeking a second term in the 1st Congressional District, last held by a Democrat in 2011. Rudy Soto, who served nine years in the Army National Guard, hopes to change that.

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